• Joshua Duvall

Worst Passwords of 2019

Yes, it's that time of year again.  With news of data breaches regularly appearing in the nightly news, individuals and businesses alike should take time to revisit their password practices.  Given the sometimes devastating consequences that can flow from data breach, it's shocking that "123456," "123456789," "qwerty," "password," and "1234567" are still among the worst offenders.


Below are the top 25 worst passwords from SplashData's “Worst passwords of 2019” list.


1 - 123456 (rank unchanged from 2018) 2 - 123456789 (up 1) 3 - qwerty (Up 6) 4 - password (Down 2) 5 - 1234567 (Up 2) 6 - 12345678 (Down 2) 7 - 12345 (Down 2) 8 - iloveyou (Up 2) 9 - 111111 (Down 3) 10 - 123123 (Up 7) 11 - abc123 (Up 4) 12 - qwerty123 (Up 13) 13 - 1q2w3e4r (New) 14 - admin (Down 2) 15 - qwertyuiop (New) 16 - 654321 (Up 3) 17 - 555555 (New) 18 - lovely (New) 19 - 7777777 (New) 20 - welcome (Down 7) 21 - 888888 (New) 22 - princess (Down 11) 23 - dragon (New) 24 - password1 (Unchanged) 25 - 123qwe (New)


According to SplashData, the following are simple tips that you can use to be safer from hackers online:


  • Use passphrases of twelve characters or more with mixed types of characters.

  • Use a different password for each of your logins. That way, if a hacker gets access to one of your passwords, they will not be able to use it to access other sites.

  • Protect your assets and personal identity by using a password manager to organize passwords, generate secure random passwords, and automatically log into websites.


SplashData's Worst Passwords of 2019


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#cyberjudicata #cyber


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